Spring Newletter

 

Winter Newsletter  Issue #6  Winter 2010- 11

 


 

For many in the Northern Temperate Climates this is the off season.  Boats and RVs have been winterized and tucked away for the winter.  But for many of you there is no off season.  I'm talking about those of you in Live Aboards, Houseboats, and Motor Homes. Inside its no longer hot and sticky just cold and soggy. Find out how our dehumidifier will make living aboard this winter less soggy and more livable. more.....

In this Issue you will find:

1.   Beating Condensation and Staying Dry this Winter in your boat or RV. (more)
2.   If a forced air central heating system or other heating system for your boat or RV is either too expensive to install or perhaps not practical Consider a Dehumidifier. (more)
3.   Temperature Limitations of our boat and RV dehumidifier. (more)
4.   The difference between a dehumidifier and ac unit. (more)
5.   The dehumidifier uses refrigeration principles won't this cool down my cabin even further in mild weather? (more)
6.   Compare our boat and RV Dehumidifier to other products (more)
7.   FAQ's on winter time operation and operation in below freezing weather. (more)
8.   RV Winterizing

 

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1. Beating Condensation and Staying Dry this Winter in your boat or RV.

The Challenge: Staying Dry

The Culprit: Condensation

 

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The Solution: Three steps to beating condensation in your boat or RV and staying dry this winter.

For many in the Northern Temperate Climates this is the off season.  Boats and RVs have been winterized and tucked away for the winter.  But for many of you there is no off season.  I'm talking about those of you in Live Aboards, Houseboats, and Motor Homes.  Even in the South: Miami, Houston, New Orleans Winter means mild weather.  What to do? For starters don't put away your dehumidifiers just yet.  Keep them running, especially if you plan on spending time in your boat or motor coach during the milder season.    Condensation is the biggest problem during the winter season.  With the mild temperature comes increased condensation.  Moisture on cooler surfaces means more condensation. Humidity condenses on cold surfaces and makes everything soggy.  You are no longer hot and sticky anymore, just cold and soggy.  At risk are liveaboards, houseboats, and motor coach owners.

 

3 Steps to reducing condensation during mild weather.

1. For a quick, short term fix, use vents and exhaust fans to vent humid air from cooking, washing and bathing to the outside.  If you don't have vents or exhaust fans, throw a window or hatch open to let in less humid, fresh air.  Sure the outside air is cold and you will loose some heat, but the short time trade off of warmth vs. condensation is well worth it.

2.  For a long term fix use a marine dehumidifier to reduce condensation.  The dehumidifier will work steadily in the background at reducing the humidity in the air in your houseboat, motor coach, or live aboard.

3.  Even with best humidity reduction results and a heating system, your living space must still remain livable, so your humidity levels will still hover around 35%RH.  Therefore you will still experience some condensation.  Windows, hull, walls, hatches are prone to condensation.   Use water absorbent products such as water snakes, sausages, water eaters (Mr. Thirsty) to absorb condensation runoff from the base of these areas and on window sills.  These absorbent materials are available at your marine store or home improvement or janitorial supplies store.  Towels or paper towels will work too.  The important thing is to reduce condensation on surfaces and to dry these out regularly (especially wood) to avoid mold and mildew build up and rot down the road.

 

2.   What if a forced air central heating system or other heating system for your boat or RV is either too expensive to install or perhaps not practical.

A forced air heating system works wonders for lowering humidity, but what If a forced air central heating system or other heating system for your boat or RV is either too expensive to install or perhaps not practical, and electrical space heaters consume a lot of electricity, and create fears of the potential danger associated with boat fires caused by electrical space heaters, then consider using a dehumidifier.

 

3. Temperature Limitations of our DH-10 Boat and RV dehumidifier:


DH-10  the Dh-10 dehumidifier will not operate properly at temperatures below 50F.  Frosting can begin at 50F.   The dehumidifier will definitely not operate at temperatures below 32F.  Water freezes at 32F so any condensation on the coils will freeze or frost.  We have tested and ran the dehumidifier in outdoor temperatures as low as 58F with no problems and moisture being removed just fine.

Temperature Limitations based on humidistat:
Operating Temperature Range (efficiency based on, and limited by the nylon ribbon sensing element in the humidistat)
50F to 125F (10C to 52C). In addition frosting begins around 50F which further limits the ability of the unit to remove moisture.

Note: the dehumidifier, is not recommended for unattended operation in below 50F temperature. Our customers around this time (mild weather) are on liveaboards and motor homes, where the indoor temperature is set for personal comfort, so the temperature(70F) for them is within allowable usage limits.

4. What is the difference between a dehumidifier and ac unit:

The main difference between a dehumidifier and an ac unit is that the ac unit keeps the cool air from being warmed back up again, by venting the hot air outside and venting the cool air into your living space, otherwise both hot and cold air neutralize each other out and your room would never cool down and your ac unit would essentially just have been a power hungry dehumidifier.   The dehumidifier doesn't attempt to separate cool air from hot air.  Air flowing into the dehumidifier from one end is cooled down.  This cool air continues out the back, but as it flows over the condenser it inadvertently warms back up.  So your room temperature remains the same, though, drier.  Plus the dehumidifier is more energy efficient and has humidity selection of 20%RH to 80%RH.

 

  5. The dehumidifier uses refrigeration principles won't this cool down my cabin even further in mild weather?

This is a concern for those of you in Live Aboards, Houseboats, and Motor Homes, with no off season you must endure mild weather and condensation.   Some of you are concerned that the dehumidifier will lower the temperature in your live aboard even more, since it operates on the same refrigerated principles as an air conditioner unit.  Relax.  We have taken  room temperature readings at 70F at both ends of the  dehumidifier and the temperature is about the same.  How is this so?  This is so  because damp cabin air flows over the evaporator coils (cold)  and is cooled down; true, but the same cool air blows over the condenser (hot) coils and is heated back up again and is exhausted back through the other end into your cabin.    So your cabin temperature remains the same, though, drier.

 

6. Compare our boat and RV Dehumidifier to other products for moisture control

If you would like to compare our dehumidifiers to other moisture control products please take a look at our marine dehumidifier comparison charts.

 

7.   FAQ's on winter time dehumidifier operation and dehumidifier operation in below freezing weather.

We have several questions concerning winter time operations, please visit our faq's page for more information or

http://www.edehumidifier.com/support/faq.htm#20

 

If you want to see the complete mold prevention program, you can use to keep your boat or RV mildew free, see our "Mold Prevention Program for the prevention of mold and mildew growth in your boat or RV".

 

For a complete mold prevention program go here.  You'll find a Dehumidifier Program for the prevention of mold and mildew growth in your boat or RV.

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RV Winterizing
By Mark Polk

Fall is the time of year you need to decide if your camping season is over. Parking your RV for the winter requires some preventive measures so it will be ready to use next spring. Youll also be glad you did it when you dont have costly repair bills due to the damaging results of winter. Now the question is how do you prepare it for winter, and who will be doing it? If youre like me and you enjoy performing the routine maintenance on your RV, not to mention saving a few dollars, the who part is answered. As for the how part, this checklist is the same one I used to make our Winterizing & Storing video. I feel it is the easiest and most effective way to winterize your RV.

Before you get started there are a few items you will need to have. These items can be found in most RV parts stores:

* Non-toxic RV antifreeze (the amount depends on the layout and length of your plumbing lines. 2 to 3 gallons will normally do).

* A water heater by-pass kit, if not already installed.

* A water pump converter kit, or tubing to connect to the inlet side of the water pump.

* Basic hand tools to remove drain plugs.

Now we can winterize the RV water system to protect it from freezing. Be sure to read your owners manuals for unit specific winterizing guidelines. Follow the steps below that apply to your RV.

* If you have any inline water filters remove and bypass them before starting.

* Drain the fresh water holding tank.

* Drain and flush the gray and black holding tanks. Clean the black tank with a wand. Lubricate the termination valves.

* Drain the water heater. CAUTION: Never drain when hot or under pressure.

* Open all hot and cold faucets; don't forget the toilet valve and outside shower.

* Locate and open low point drain lines. Using the water pump will help force water out, but turn it off as soon as the system is drained.

* Recap all drains and close all faucets.

* By-pass the water heater. If you do not have a by-pass kit installed the water heater will fill up with antifreeze before it goes through the water lines, wasting six gallons of antifreeze.

* Install a water pump converter kit, or disconnect the inlet side of the pump (the line coming from the fresh water holding tank) and connect tubing from the pump into a gallon of RV antifreeze.

* Turn the water pump on and pressurize the system. Starting with the closest faucet slowly open the hot and then cold valves until antifreeze appears. Replace antifreeze jug as required.

* Repeat on all faucets from the closest to farthest away. Don't forget the outside shower.

* Flush the toilet until antifreeze appears.

* Turn the water pump off and open a faucet to release the pressure. Go to the city water inlet.

* Remove the small screen over the inlet and push in on the valve with a small screwdriver until you see antifreeze. Replace the screen.

* Pour a cupful of antifreeze down each drain. Pour a few cups in the toilet and flush into the holding tank.

* If your water heater has an electric heating element turn it off. This will protect the element if the unit is plugged in while being stored.

* Make sure all faucets are closed.

* Consult your owner manuals for winterizing ice makers and washing machines.

Your RV is winterized

This checklist is a basic guide that was intended to assist you in winterizing your RV. As with many other checklists it would be impossible to cover every RV. It is extremely important that you read your owners manuals for unit specific winterizing guidelines.

Happy Camping!

Mark

Copyright 2006 by Mark J. Polk, owner of RV Education 101

RV Expert Mark Polk, seen on TV, is the producer & host of America's most highly regarded series of DVD's, videos, books, and e-books. http://www.rveducation101.com/

Sign up for your free "RV Education 101" Newsletter http://rveducation101.com/email/

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